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Sexuality, Sexually Inappropriate, Sexualized Behaviors

Sexuality, Sexually Inappropriate, Sexualized Behaviors

Why should I do it:

  • Discussing topics of sexuality must only be done after parental, school, and other necessary consent and must adhere to local, state, and federal laws, guidlines, and procedures
  • Teachers and other general education school staff should not address abnormal sexualized student behaviors without consulting the School Counselors, School Social Workers, School Psychologists, or other professional staff in the building or district trained to work with such issues

When should I do it:

  • Discussing topics of sexuality must only be done after parental, school, and other necessary consent and must adhere to local, state, and federal laws, guidlines, and procedures
  • Normative sex education is generally provided through the school’s predetermined cirriculum, therefore you should consult with the sexual education teacher in your school or district for general sex education quetsions or lessons
  • Teachers and other general education school staff should not address abnormal sexualized student behaviors without consulting the School Counselors, School Social Workers, School Psychologists, or other professional staff in the building or district trained to work with such issues
  • The resources and information below will be most helpful and relevent for School Counselors, School Social Workers, School Psychologists, and other similar professional staff who deal with and put interventions into place to address sexualized behaviors of students in classrooms, small groups, and individually

How do I do it:

  • Discussing topics of sexuality must only be done after parental, school, and other necessary consent and must adhere to local, state, and federal laws, guidlines, and procedures
  • Normative sex education is generally provided through the school’s predetermined cirriculum, therefore you should consult with the sexual education teacher in your school or district for general sex education quetsions or lessons
  • The resources and information below will be most helpful and relevent for School Counselors, School Social Workers, School Psychologists, and other similar professional staff who deal with and put interventions into place to address sexualized behaviors of students in classrooms, small groups, and individually

Resources & Support for technique:


Footnotes:

  1. Johnson, T. C. READING FOR CHILD AND YOUTH CARE WORKERS, ISSUE 30, JULY 2001. The Child Care Worker, Vol. 13 No.6 Understanding the Sexual behavior of Children. [http://www.cyc-net.org/cyc-online/cycol-0701-toni1.html].
  2. Gunderson, C. Denali Family Services (2010). Understanding Childhood Sexual Behavior. [http://hss.state.ak.us/ocs/ECCS/pdf/Gunderson-UnderstandingChildhoodSexualBehavior.pdf].
  3. Markan, L. K. (1999). Socialization of Sexuality in Children: Teaching and talking about boundaries and behaviors. [http://www.findingstone.com/parenting/safeboundaries.htm].
  4. Prepared by Special Programs Branch, Ministry of Education, British Columbia 1999. Responding to Children’s Problem Sexual Behaviour in Elementary Schools. [http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/sco/resourcedocs/probsexbehave.pdf].
  5. NEW JERSEY COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH EDUCATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK. Standard 2.4: Human Sexuality and Family Life. [http://www.nj.gov/education/frameworks/chpe/chapter8d.pdf].
  6. The PSHE Association. KS3/4 PSHE – What is Sexual Bullying?. [http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/KS3-4-PSHE-What-is-Sexual-Bullying-6047843/].
  7. GUIDANCE & POLICY DEVELOPMENT – Sheffield Secondary Schools Lesson Plans & Resources. Sheffield Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) Guidance & Policy Development (Aged 11-16). [http://www.sheffieldhealthyschools.co.uk/downloads/SRE_toolkit_PDFs/Book2-web.pdf].
  8. Advocates for Youth. (2008). Sexuality Lessons. [http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/sexuality-lessons].
  9. Advocates for Youth. (2008).
    Advocates’ Curricula and Education Programs.
    [http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/serced/950?task=view].
  10. Advocates for Youth. (2008). Topics & Issues. [http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/topics-and-issues].
  11. Miller, T. SOCIAL/SEX EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS . [http://icevi.org/publications/icevix/wshops/0412.html].
  12. Sex Ed Library. SEXUAL BEHAVIOR. [http://www.sexedlibrary.org/index.cfm?pageId=726].
  13. Alberta Health Services. (2011). Respect for Oneself and Others: Physical Boundaries. [http://www.teachingsexualhealth.ca/media/lessons/Diversity_PhysicalBoundaries.pdf].
  14. Adapted by Zimdars, J., Edited by Grove, A. (2011). Sex Education for Students with Physical Disabilities. [http://www.brighthub.com/education/special/articles/36878.aspx].
  15. Lesson Planet., Education Planet. Rape, Sexual Assault, and Harassment Lesson Plans. [http://www.lessonplanet.com/lesson-plans/rape-sexual-assault-and-harassment].
  16. Georgia State University. Social-Sexual Education for Individuals with Disabilities.ppt. [www2.gsu.edu/~wwwche/Sex%20Ed%20powerpoint.ppt].
  17. Head Start of Lane County. (2011). Sexualized Behaviors in Classrooms. [http://www.hsolc.org/sexualized-behaviors-classrooms].
  18. Irvin, A. International Women’s Health Coalition, New York. November 2004. Positively Informed: Lesson Plans and Guidance for Sexuality Educators and Advocates. [http://www.iwhc.org/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=2594].
  19. ASD Concepts, LLC. Sexuality And Autism: Literature. [http://www.child-autism-parent-cafe.com/sexuality-and-autism.html].
  20. Delaney, R. Foster Children and Sexualized Behavior. [http://www.toolboxparent.com/PowerTools/Delaney/FosterCareSexualized.aspx].
  21. Child Sexual Abuse Committee of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network in partnership with the National Center on Sexual Behavior of Youth. Understanding and Coping with Sexual Behavior Problems in Children. [http://www.nctsnet.org/nctsn_assets/pdfs/caring/sexualbehaviorproblems.pdf].