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Managing transition times

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PBIS World
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I'm looking for ideas for managing transition times in the classroom. As soon as we transition to a new activity, many students begin acting out, won't settle down, etc.

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PBIS World
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http://essentialeducator.org/?p=8367\nhttps://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/improve-transition-time-management\nhttps://www.responsiveclassroom.org/transition-times\nhttps://www.responsiveclassroom.org/article/teaching-transitions\nhttp://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/management_tips/management_tips049.shtml\nhttp://www.behaviourneeds.com/classroommanagementstrategies/classroom-management-strategies-for-smooth-transition-times/\n\nHopefully there is something new in here helpful or to get your mind going.\nCheers!"}" data-sheets-userformat="{"2":961,"3":{"1":0},"9":0,"10":1,"11":4,"12":0}">Setting up a formal routine for transitions can be helpful. When kids have a specific task or goal to reach toward or complete during transitions, this can help focus and reign them in somewhat.

For example, making a list of expectations for transitions that students must follow. This could look something like this:
1. clean up table area
2. check floor for trash and clean it up
3. put books back on bookshelf quietly
4. use low voice
5. hands, feet, and body to self
6. follow the line on the floor directly to the next center

This is just an example and will be totally different depending on where and what you need it for. Perhaps there could be a reward or incentive for following the transition routine. Students could have a chart they check off as they complete each step in a transition. Those students that complete all tasks during all transitions throughout the morning get 5 minutes before lunch to use the computer, talk to friends, read, etc. Students that fail to meet the expectations less than 50% of the time lose 5 minutes of free time during morning free time. And then in the afternoon, the same. Students either get 5 extra minutes at the end of the day or lose 5 minutes from free time.

This is just one narrow idea. Take a look at these links for more ideas and thought:
http://essentialeducator.org/?p=8367
https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/improve-transition-time-management
https://www.responsiveclassroom.org/transition-times
https://www.responsiveclassroom.org/article/teaching-transitions
http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/management_tips/management_tips049.shtml
http://www.behaviourneeds.com/classroommanagementstrategies/classroom-management-strategies-for-smooth-transition-times/

Hopefully there is something new in here helpful or to get your mind going.
Cheers!

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In summary of the previously described processes and links for professional research:
Communicate the class-generated expectations clearly.
Scaffold the expectations with possible picture schedule of what the students are expected to do.
Hold the student accountable for the expectations during transition time. Simply losing the five minutes of recess/free time might not make the redirection "stick."
It sounds like your teaching a primary class. What the student is doing during that five minutes is the important piece that is often forgotten. Discussion regarding the expectation that was not followed and what you as the teacher is going to do to help the student learn the expectation during that five minutes is key. Here is an example that I have proven successful time and time again as a kindergarten teacher of 12 years:

The expectation: Every transition in our class takes exactly 10 seconds as every student counts backwards aloud.

If a student fails to follow that expectation... the student will practice turning in his homework folder and coming to the carpet as he/she counts backwards from ten to zero during that five minutes from recess over and over. (Practice the expected behavior.)

It is important that this is not seen as a punitive measure by the student but more of means that you are doing to help the student get better at the specific routine he/she is practicing and that you are helping them because you like them. I used to say, "Because I like you... I am going to help you become the quickest and most quiet student coming to the carpet in the whole class during your recess!"

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Excellent info, tips, and examples Principal_Winkelman1 ! Thanks for chiming in on this discussion. I really appreciate your comments about using that 5 minutes or whatever the consequence may be to reinforce the behavior you DO want the student to demonstrate. Simply sitting on the wall for 5 minutes is not nearly as affective as reinforcing and teaching strategies to bolster what the student should be doing. And your example phrase of what you used to say is excellent as well! I love that you reframe it as a positive.

Another thought, adding on to Principal_Winkelman1's idea of using the 5 minutes to teach the expectations, is to even create leadership roles for transitions, whereby the students that seem to have more trouble during these times might receive special "training" to be the line-up leader, table organizer, etc. Something along this line may help to make the expectations stick. There's nothing quite like being in a leadership and teaching role that makes thoughts, ideas, and concepts stick longer term and in a more profound way.

For older elementary kids think sheets might be useful during the 5 minutes out. You could create some tailored think sheets specifically regarding transition expectations. Younger kids may respond to having to use their 5 minutes to review social stories about the expectations.

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Take time to model exactly what you want the transitions to look, sound, and feel like. From there, practice it. Each time there after, expect the transitions to be exactly as practiced and hole the class responsible. Do a reset if it wasn't done right.

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