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Disruptive avoidance behavior with K student

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I need help with interventions for a student in Kindergarten who will leave his table and hide in various locations in the room. It happens at a high frequency during math. The student will start math off by being off task. After the teacher redirecting his behavior or reiterating the directions he will turn his body away from the speaker. The teacher will redirect/reiterate direction and the student will then leave his seat and hide. If a door is open, he will leave the room. The teacher will redirect behavior and eventually get the student to sit at his seat, but as soon as she returns to teaching whole group the student will leave his seat again and hide. Do any of you have ideas on how to replace this behavior? Any intervention ideas.

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http://teachingwithnancy.blogspot.com/2013/06/texas-early-mathematics-intervention.html\n\nhttp://webs.morton709.org/elementary/RTI Math Final/Teacher Resources/RTI Math Teacher Resources K-2.pdf\n\n http://www.whsd.k12.pa.us/olc/page.aspx?id=30949&s=1434\n\nhttp://windom.mn.schoolwebpages.com/education/components/scrapbook/default.php?sectiondetailid=2204&\n\nhttp://whatilearnedinkindergarten.blogspot.com/2012/10/where-to-find-rti-and-research-based.html\n\nhttp://www.wayne.k12.ga.us/Jesup.cfm?subpage=508718\n\n\nIf the student has a really short tolerance, you could implement smaller incentives at very short intervals. For example, work on one problem, then give a small incentive, like throwing a ball back and forth a few times, getting up, running and touching the teacher's desk and then back to seat, etc. \n\nSome other things that may or may not help include sensory interventions, like sitting on a bumpy cushion, textured pencils, standing while working, etc. Maybe you could associate a special item, activity, or motion with math as a sort of familiar comfort to help the student reduce anxiety about the subject. For example, the student might have a special \"math robe\" they get from a coat rack and wear during math or a hat, hoody with hood they pull over, sun glasses, shirt, big fuzzy slippers, etc. They could be called the students math slippers or math cape, etc. But the student is only allowed to wear them during math time. \n\nIf possible, combine math with an activity the student finds more enjoyable, like doing math on the computer through computer math games, which you should be able to find plenty of by googling \"computer math games\" or \"online math games\", etc. Other ways to do this include using items the student likes to count, add, subtract, etc. If the student likes cars, marbles, etc, then lining up and counting, adding, and subtracting toy cars or whatever may help. \n\nOne last thing is to tell the student about famous people that use math. This will take some real thinking as I can't say off-hand what famous people/characters a kindergartener would admire who use math or do something related to math. \n\nAs always, try different learning styles and methods: visual, auditory, hands-on, etc. And be sure to give a ton of positive praise when the student does remain seated, makes an attempt at a problem, etc. \n\nBest of luck!"}" data-sheets-userformat="{"2":961,"3":{"1":0},"9":0,"10":1,"11":4,"12":0}">f you haven't associated any incentives with remaining in their seat, you might try this first. For example, fill a hat with slips of paper that have various incentives or rewards that the student likes. You can use the Forced Choice Reinforcement Survey to figure out which types of incentives might motivate the student, adult time, play time, peer time, physical rewards, etc.

When sitting down for math, remind the student that if they stay in their seat during math, they will get to pull am incentive out of the hat after. If the entire math period is too much for the student, you might begin by shortening the student's math time to a quarter of the norm. Over time, you can increase the time to half, 3/4, and full time. Maybe if you can get them to tolerate a math time with incentives and smaller but ever increasing time periods, you can eventually get them to sitting the whole time.

If this behavior is primarily occurring at math time, then it is probably safe to say the student especially has trouble with math or understanding concepts. Or perhaps they just don't like the subject and are capable if they try. Maybe some RTI strategies might help on the academic end, which could result in improved behavior. Check these out for math RTI ideas, resources, and info:

http://teachingwithnancy.blogspot.com/2013/06/texas-early-mathematics-intervention.html

http://webs.morton709.org/elementary/RTI Math Final/Teacher Resources/RTI Math Teacher Resources K-2.pdf

http://www.whsd.k12.pa.us/olc/page.aspx?id=30949&s=1434

http://windom.mn.schoolwebpages.com/education/components/scrapbook/default.php?sectiondetailid=2204&

http://whatilearnedinkindergarten.blogspot.com/2012/10/where-to-find-rti-and-research-based.html

http://www.wayne.k12.ga.us/Jesup.cfm?subpage=508718

If the student has a really short tolerance, you could implement smaller incentives at very short intervals. For example, work on one problem, then give a small incentive, like throwing a ball back and forth a few times, getting up, running and touching the teacher's desk and then back to seat, etc.

Some other things that may or may not help include sensory interventions, like sitting on a bumpy cushion, textured pencils, standing while working, etc. Maybe you could associate a special item, activity, or motion with math as a sort of familiar comfort to help the student reduce anxiety about the subject. For example, the student might have a special "math robe" they get from a coat rack and wear during math or a hat, hoody with hood they pull over, sun glasses, shirt, big fuzzy slippers, etc. They could be called the students math slippers or math cape, etc. But the student is only allowed to wear them during math time.

If possible, combine math with an activity the student finds more enjoyable, like doing math on the computer through computer math games, which you should be able to find plenty of by googling "computer math games" or "online math games", etc. Other ways to do this include using items the student likes to count, add, subtract, etc. If the student likes cars, marbles, etc, then lining up and counting, adding, and subtracting toy cars or whatever may help.

One last thing is to tell the student about famous people that use math. This will take some real thinking as I can't say off-hand what famous people/characters a kindergartener would admire who use math or do something related to math.

As always, try different learning styles and methods: visual, auditory, hands-on, etc. And be sure to give a ton of positive praise when the student does remain seated, makes an attempt at a problem, etc.

Best of luck!

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